↓ Skip to main content

Combining perceptual regulation and exergaming for exercise prescription in low-active adults with and without cognitive impairment

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 205)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
33 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
Title
Combining perceptual regulation and exergaming for exercise prescription in low-active adults with and without cognitive impairment
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13102-018-0091-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liam McAuliffe, Gaynor C. Parfitt, Roger G. Eston, Caitlin Gray, Hannah A. D. Keage, Ashleigh E. Smith

Abstract

Exercise adherence in already low-active older adults with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI) remains low. Perceptual regulation and exergaming may facilitate future exercise behaviour by improving the affective experience, however evidence that this population can perceptually regulate is lacking. To explore this, we investigated 1) perceptual regulation of exercise intensity during either exergaming or regular ergometer cycling and 2) explored affective responses. Thirty-two low active older adults (73.9 ± 7.3 years, n = 16, 8 females) with or without MCI (70.9 ± 5.5 years, n = 16, 11 females) participated in a sub-maximal fitness assessment to determine ventilatory threshold (VT) and two experimental sessions (counterbalanced: exergaming or regular ergometer cycling). Experimental sessions consisted 21-min of continuous cycling with 7-min at each: RPE 9, 11 and 13. Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR), and affect (Feeling Scale) were obtained throughout the exercise. VO2 (p < 0.01) and HR (p < 0.01) increased linearly with RPE, but were not significantly different between exercise modes or cognitive groups. At RPE 13, participants worked above VT in both modes (exergaming: 115.7 ± 27.3; non-exergaming 114.1 ± 24.3 VO2 (%VT)). Regardless of cognitive group, affect declined significantly as RPE increased (p < 0.01). However on average, affect remained pleasant throughout and did not differ between exercise modes or cognitive groups. These results suggest low-active older adults can perceptually regulate exercise intensity, regardless of cognition or mode. At RPE 13, participants regulated above VT, at an intensity that improves cardiorespiratory fitness long-term, and affect remained positive in the majority of participants, which may support long-term physical activity adherence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 27%
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Unspecified 2 6%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 8 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Unspecified 3 9%
Psychology 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2018.
All research outputs
#834,739
of 14,130,514 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#36
of 205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,752
of 357,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,130,514 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 205 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 357,906 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them