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Acceptability of financial incentives for maintenance of weight loss in mid-older adults: a mixed methods study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2018
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Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
Acceptability of financial incentives for maintenance of weight loss in mid-older adults: a mixed methods study
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5136-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bronwyn McGill, Blythe J. O’Hara, Anne C. Grunseit, Adrian Bauman, Dale Osborne, Luke Lawler, Philayrath Phongsavan

Abstract

Health insurers worldwide implement financial incentive schemes to encourage health-related behaviours, including to facilitate weight loss. The maintenance of weight loss is a public health challenge, and as non-communicable diseases become more prevalent with increasing age, mid-older adults could benefit from programs which motivate weight loss maintenance. However, little is understood about their perceptions of using financial incentives to maintain weight loss. We used mixed methods to explore the attitudes and views of participants who had completed an Australian weight loss and lifestyle modification program offered to overweight and obese health insurance members with weight-related chronic diseases, about the acceptability and usefulness of different types of financial incentives to support weight loss maintenance. An online survey was completed by 130 respondents (mean age = 64 years); and a further 28 participants (mean age = 65 years) attended six focus groups. Both independent samples of participants supported a formalised maintenance program. Online survey respondents reported that non-cash (85.2%) and cash (77%) incentives would be potentially motivating; but only 40.5% reported that deposit contracts would motivate weight loss maintenance. Results of in-depth discussions found overall low support for any type of financial incentive, but particularly deposit contracts and lotteries. Some participants expressed that improved health was of more value than a monetary incentive and that they felt personally responsible for their own health, which was at odds with the idea of financial incentives. Others suggested ongoing program and peer support as potentially useful for weight loss maintenance. If financial incentives are considered for mid-older Australian adults in the health insurance setting, program planners will need to balance the discordance between participant beliefs about the individual responsibility for health and their desire for external supports to motivate and sustain weight loss maintenance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 19%
Student > Master 4 19%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Psychology 2 10%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Other 7 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,719,077
of 13,138,880 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,193
of 9,024 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,011
of 349,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,138,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,024 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 349,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them