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S100B polymorphisms are associated with age of onset of Parkinson’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genetics, March 2018
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Title
S100B polymorphisms are associated with age of onset of Parkinson’s disease
Published in
BMC Medical Genetics, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12881-018-0547-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camilla Fardell, Anna Zettergren, Caroline Ran, Andrea Carmine Belin, Agneta Ekman, Olof Sydow, Lars Bäckman, Björn Holmberg, Nil Dizdar, Peter Söderkvist, Hans Nissbrandt

Abstract

In this study we investigated the association between SNPs in the S100B gene and Parkinson's disease (PD) in two independent Swedish cohorts. The SNP rs9722 has previously been shown to be associated with higher S100B concentrations in serum and frontal cortex in humans. S100B is widely expressed in the central nervous system and has many functions such as regulating calcium homeostasis, inflammatory processes, cytoskeleton assembly/disassembly, protein phosphorylation and degradation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. Several of these functions have been suggested to be of importance for the pathophysiology of PD. The SNPs rs9722, rs2239574, rs881827, rs9984765, and rs1051169 of the S100B gene were genotyped using the KASPar® PCR SNP genotyping system in a case-control study of two populations (431 PD patients and 465 controls, 195 PD patients and 378 controls, respectively). The association between the genotype and allelic distributions and PD risk was evaluated using Chi-Square and Cox proportional hazards test, as well as logistic regression. Linear regression and Cox proportional hazards tests were applied to assess the effect of the rs9722 genotypes on age of disease onset. The S100B SNPs tested were not associated with the risk of PD. However, in both cohorts, the T allele of rs9722 was significantly more common in early onset PD patients compared to late onset PD patients. The SNP rs9722 was significantly related to age of onset, and each T allele lowered disease onset with 4.9 years. In addition, allelic variants of rs881827, rs9984765, and rs1051169, were significantly more common in early-onset PD compared to late-onset PD in the pooled population. rs9722, a functional SNP in the 3'-UTR of the S100B gene, was strongly associated with age of onset of PD.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 29%
Researcher 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 2 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Unknown 3 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2018.
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#11,256,950
of 12,645,670 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genetics
#610
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#238,251
of 274,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genetics
#1
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