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Seasonal transmission potential and activity peaks of the new influenza A(H1N1): a Monte Carlo likelihood analysis based on human mobility

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
203 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
268 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
Title
Seasonal transmission potential and activity peaks of the new influenza A(H1N1): a Monte Carlo likelihood analysis based on human mobility
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2009
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-7-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Duygu Balcan, Hao Hu, Bruno Goncalves, Paolo Bajardi, Chiara Poletto, Jose J Ramasco, Daniela Paolotti, Nicola Perra, Michele Tizzoni, Wouter Van den Broeck, Vittoria Colizza, Alessandro Vespignani

Abstract

On 11 June the World Health Organization officially raised the phase of pandemic alert (with regard to the new H1N1 influenza strain) to level 6. As of 19 July, 137,232 cases of the H1N1 influenza strain have been officially confirmed in 142 different countries, and the pandemic unfolding in the Southern hemisphere is now under scrutiny to gain insights about the next winter wave in the Northern hemisphere. A major challenge is pre-emptied by the need to estimate the transmission potential of the virus and to assess its dependence on seasonality aspects in order to be able to use numerical models capable of projecting the spatiotemporal pattern of the pandemic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 268 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 5%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Italy 4 1%
Brazil 3 1%
Canada 3 1%
Australia 3 1%
Spain 3 1%
France 2 <1%
Vietnam 1 <1%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 226 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 73 27%
Researcher 66 25%
Student > Master 28 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 6%
Professor 14 5%
Other 51 19%
Unknown 19 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 16%
Physics and Astronomy 35 13%
Computer Science 28 10%
Mathematics 26 10%
Other 63 24%
Unknown 27 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,120,251
of 12,365,836 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#917
of 1,973 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,286
of 268,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#40
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,365,836 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,973 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,450 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.