↓ Skip to main content

“One program that could improve health in this neighbourhood is ____?” using concept mapping to engage communities as part of a health and human services needs assessment

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, March 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
“One program that could improve health in this neighbourhood is ____?” using concept mapping to engage communities as part of a health and human services needs assessment
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-2936-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alisa J. Velonis, Agnes Molnar, Nakia Lee-Foon, Ashnoor Rahim, Mary Boushel, Patricia O’Campo

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a rapid needs assessment conducted at the request of the local health authority responsible for health care services, the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (Ontario, Canada), to inform health and social service planning. We utilized concept mapping methodology to facilitate engagement with diverse stakeholders-more than 300 community members and service providers-with a focus on hard to reach populations. Key informant interviews with service providers were used to augment findings. Participants identified 48 unique services or service approaches they believed would improve the health of residents in the area, including those addressing health care, mental health and addictions, youth, families, people experiencing homelessness, seniors, general social services, and services targeting specific populations. While service providers consistently identified a critical need for mental health and addiction services, community members placed greater importance on the social determinants of health including access to housing, job placement supports and training and service accessibility. Both groups agreed that services and programs for seniors and people experiencing homelessness would be highly important. Our study provides a unique example of using concept mapping as a tool to aid a rapid service gap analysis and community engagement in a metropolitan area. The findings also reinforce the importance of working cross-sectorally, using a Health in All Policies approach when planning services for underserved populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 32%
Unspecified 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 11 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 22%
Psychology 4 11%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,096,146
of 12,793,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,486
of 4,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,367
of 274,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,793,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,234 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,087 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them