↓ Skip to main content

Radioactive 125I seeds inhibit cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human glioblastoma multiforme via a ROS-mediated signaling pathway

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, February 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
118 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Radioactive 125I seeds inhibit cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human glioblastoma multiforme via a ROS-mediated signaling pathway
Published in
BMC Cancer, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-15-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yunhong Tian, Qiang Xie, Jie He, Xiaojun Luo, Tao Zhou, Ying Liu, Zuoping Huang, Yunming Tian, Dan Sun, Kaitai Yao

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary central nervous system neoplasm in adults. Radioactive (125)I seed implantation has been widely applied in the treatment of cancers. Moreover, previous clinical trials have confirmed that (125)I seeds treatment was an effective therapy in GBM. We sought to investigate the effect of (125)I seed on GBM cell growth and Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cells were exposed to irradiation at different doses. Colony-formation assay, EdU assay, cell cycle analysis, and TUNEL assay were preformed to investigate the radiation sensitivity. The effects of (125)I seeds irradiation on EMT were measured by transwell, Boyden and wound-healing assays. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by DCF-DA assay. Moreover, the radiation sensitivity and EMT were investigated with or without pretreatment with glutathione. Additionally, nude mice with tumors were measured after treated with radiation. Radioactive (125)I seeds are more effective than X-ray irradiation in inhibiting GBM cell growth. Moreover, EMT was effectively inhibited by (125)I seed irradiation. A mechanism study indicated that GBM cell growth and EMT inhibition were induced by (125)I seeds with the involvement of a ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Radioactive (125)I seeds exhibit novel anticancer activity via a ROS-mediated signaling pathway. These findings have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with GBM by (125)I seeds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 27%
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Student > Postgraduate 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 18%
Social Sciences 1 9%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,344,408
of 7,108,255 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,201
of 3,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,779
of 207,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#39
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,108,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,198 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.