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Molecular epidemiology of human sporotrichosis in Venezuela reveals high frequency of Sporothrix globosa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2015
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Title
Molecular epidemiology of human sporotrichosis in Venezuela reveals high frequency of Sporothrix globosa
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0839-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emma Camacho, Isabel León-Navarro, Sabrina Rodríguez-Brito, Mireya Mendoza, Gustavo A Niño-Vega

Abstract

Sporotrichosis is a cutaneous and subcutaneous fungal disease of humans and other mammals, known to be caused by the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, which comprises four species of clinical importance: S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. luriei, and S. schenckii sensu stricto. Of them, S. globosa and S. schenckii s. str. show global distribution and differences in global frequency as causal agents of the disease. In the Americas, only three species are present: S. schenckii s. str., S. brasiliensis (so far, only reported in Brazil), and S. globosa. In Venezuela, since the first case of sporotrichosis reported in 1935, S. schenckii have been considered its unique etiological agent. In the present work, the presence of more than one species in the country was evaluated. By phenotypic key features and molecular phylogeny analyses, we re-examined 30 isolates from diverse Venezuelan regions belonging to the fungi collection of Instituto de Biomedicina, Caracas, Venezuela, and national reference center for skin diseases. All isolates were collected between 1973 and 2013, and maintained in distilled water. Sporotrichosis in Venezuela is mainly caused by S. schenckii s. str. (70%). However, a significant proportion (30%) of sporotrichosis cases in the country can be attributable to S. globosa. A correlation between intraspecific genotypes and clinical presentation is proposed. Our data suggest that sporotrichosis various clinical forms might be related to genetic diversity of isolates, and possibly, to diverse virulence profiles previously reported in the S. schenckii species complex. Sporothrix globosa was found to be the causative agent of 30% of sporotrichosis for the Venezuelan cases re-examined, the highest frequency of this species so far reported in the Americas. The high genetic variability presented by S. schenckii s. str. indicates that species distinction based on phenotypic key features could be a challenging and uncertain task; molecular identification should be always employed.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
Mexico 1 3%
Unknown 27 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Postgraduate 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Other 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 21%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 17%
Unspecified 4 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2015.
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#3,403,218
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Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,894
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Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#92
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