↓ Skip to main content

Similarity of the dog and human gut microbiomes in gene content and response to diet

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 874)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
51 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
120 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
181 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Similarity of the dog and human gut microbiomes in gene content and response to diet
Published in
Microbiome, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0450-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luis Pedro Coelho, Jens Roat Kultima, Paul Igor Costea, Coralie Fournier, Yuanlong Pan, Gail Czarnecki-Maulden, Matthew Robert Hayward, Sofia K. Forslund, Thomas Sebastian Benedikt Schmidt, Patrick Descombes, Janet R. Jackson, Qinghong Li, Peer Bork

Abstract

Gut microbes influence their hosts in many ways, in particular by modulating the impact of diet. These effects have been studied most extensively in humans and mice. In this work, we used whole genome metagenomics to investigate the relationship between the gut metagenomes of dogs, humans, mice, and pigs. We present a dog gut microbiome gene catalog containing 1,247,405 genes (based on 129 metagenomes and a total of 1.9 terabasepairs of sequencing data). Based on this catalog and taxonomic abundance profiling, we show that the dog microbiome is closer to the human microbiome than the microbiome of either pigs or mice. To investigate this similarity in terms of response to dietary changes, we report on a randomized intervention with two diets (high-protein/low-carbohydrate vs. lower protein/higher carbohydrate). We show that diet has a large and reproducible effect on the dog microbiome, independent of breed or sex. Moreover, the responses were in agreement with those observed in previous human studies. We conclude that findings in dogs may be predictive of human microbiome results. In particular, a novel finding is that overweight or obese dogs experience larger compositional shifts than lean dogs in response to a high-protein diet.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 120 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 181 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 181 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 21%
Researcher 34 19%
Student > Master 29 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Other 11 6%
Other 29 16%
Unknown 24 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 17%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 30 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 6%
Other 26 14%
Unknown 29 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 485. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2020.
All research outputs
#22,549
of 15,306,165 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#10
of 874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,003
of 278,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,306,165 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 874 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,029 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them