↓ Skip to main content

Gender-specific mortality in DTP-IPV- and MMR ± MenC-eligible age groups to determine possible sex-differential effects of vaccination: an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
Title
Gender-specific mortality in DTP-IPV- and MMR ± MenC-eligible age groups to determine possible sex-differential effects of vaccination: an observational study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0898-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tessa M Schurink-van’t Klooster, Mirjam J Knol, Hester E de Melker, Marianne AB van der Sande

Abstract

Several studies suggested that vaccines could have non-specific effects on mortality depending on the type of vaccine. Non-specific effects seem to be different in boys and girls. In this study we want to investigate whether there are differences in gender-specific mortality among Dutch children according to the last vaccination received. We tested the hypothesis that the mortality rate ratio for girls versus boys is more favourable for girls following MMR ± MenC vaccination (from 14 months of age) compared with the ratio following DTP-IPV vaccination (2-13 months of age). Secondarily, we investigated whether there were gender-specific changes in mortality following booster vaccination at 4 years of age. This observational study included all Dutch children aged 0-11 years from 2000 until 2011. Age groups were classified according to the last vaccination offered. The mortality rates for all natural causes of death were calculated by gender and age group. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were computed using a multivariable Poisson analysis to compare mortality in boys and girls across different age groups. The study population consisted of 6,261,472 children. During the study period, 14,038 children (0.22%) died, 91% of which were attributed to a known natural cause of death. The mortality rate for natural causes was higher among boys than girls in all age groups. Adjusted IRRs for girls compared with boys ranged between 0.81 (95% CI 0.74-0.89) and 0.91 (95% CI 0.77-1.07) over the age groups. The IRR did not significantly differ between all vaccine-related age groups (p = 0.723), between children 2-13 months (following DTP-IPV vaccination) and 14 months - 3 years (following MMR ± MenC vaccination) (p = 0.493) and between children 14 months - 3 years and 4-8 years old (following DTP-IPV vaccination) (p = 0.868). In the Netherlands, a high income country, no differences in gender-specific mortality related to the type of last vaccination received were observed in DTP-IPV- and MMR ± MenC eligible age groups. The inability to detect this effect indicates that when non-specific effects were present the effects were not reflected in changes in the differences in mortality between boys and girls. The findings in this large population-based study are reassuring for the continued trust in the safety of the national vaccination programme.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 25%
Student > Master 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 19%
Unspecified 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,342,899
of 5,012,032 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,728
of 2,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,076
of 148,007 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#78
of 135 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,012,032 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,655 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,007 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 135 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.