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Adult attachment and emotion dysregulation in borderline personality and somatoform disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

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85 Mendeley
Title
Adult attachment and emotion dysregulation in borderline personality and somatoform disorders
Published in
Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40479-015-0026-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annemiek van Dijke, Julian D Ford

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and somatoform disorders (SoD) involve significant problems in relationships and emotion regulation, but the similarities and differences between these disorders in these areas is not well understood. In 472 psychotherapy inpatients BPD and/or SoD diagnoses were confirmed or ruled out using clinical interviews and standardized measures. Emotional under- and over-regulation and indices of adult attachment working models and fears were assessed with validated self-report measures. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine relationships among the study variables and differences based on diagnostic status. Under-regulation of emotion was moderately related to fear of abandonment but weakly related to fear of closeness. Over-regulation of emotion was moderately related to fear of closeness but not to fear of abandonment. BPD was associated with under-regulation of emotion and fear of abandonment, and, when comorbid with SoD, with fear of closeness. SoD was associated with inhibition or denial of fears of abandonment or closeness, and over-regulation of emotion. Study results suggest that insecure attachment may play a role in both BPD and SoD, but in different ways, with hyperactivating emotion dysregulation prominent in BPD and deactivating emotion dysregulation evident in SoD. Also, combined hyper- and de-activating strategy components that may reflect a pattern of disorganized attachment were found, particularly in patients with comorbid BPD and SoD.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 1%
Poland 1 1%
Unknown 83 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Other 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Researcher 9 11%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 18 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 44 52%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 9%
Neuroscience 2 2%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 18 21%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2019.
All research outputs
#7,456,970
of 22,797,621 outputs
Outputs from Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
#123
of 190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,275
of 263,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,797,621 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 190 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.