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Prevalence and risk factors associated with malaria infection among pregnant women in a semi-urban community of north-western Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
318 Mendeley
Title
Prevalence and risk factors associated with malaria infection among pregnant women in a semi-urban community of north-western Nigeria
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40249-015-0054-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sani Abdullahi Fana, Mohammed Danladi Abubakar Bunza, Sule Aliyu Anka, Asiya Umar Imam, Shehu Usman Nataala

Abstract

Malaria during pregnancy remains a serious public health problem, with substantial risks for the mother, her foetus and the newborn. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of malaria and possible risk factors for malaria infection among pregnant women in a semi-urban area in north-western Nigeria. Pregnant women are among the most susceptible to malaria infection. Knowledge of their malaria infection status is an important yardstick to measure the effectiveness of any malaria control programme. We conducted a cross sectional study in the semi-urban area of Argungu, Kebbi State Nigeria. Two hundred and fifty five pregnant women were included in the study after informed verbal consent was obtained. For each participant, the socio-demographic profile, stage of pregnancy and attitude to the use of insecticide- treated nets (ITNs) were investigated using a questionnaire. Peripheral blood samples were collected and thick blood smears were prepared and stained with Giemsa stains to check for malaria parasitaemia. The associations between age, education level and use of ITNs with occurrence of malaria infection during pregnancy were analysed using the chi-square test. One hundred and six (41.6%) out of 255 pregnant women were infected with malaria parasites, with a mean parasite density of 800 parasitesμl(-1). It was found that prevalence and parasite density decreased as age increased. The chi-square test indicated that a lack of education and non-usage of ITNs were significantly associated with malaria infection. Malaria is still a major public health issue among pregnant women mainly due to illiteracy and non -compliance to using ITNs. Increasing awareness about malaria preventive measures and early attendance of antenatal care services will help to reduce malaria and, consequently, its associated morbidities and mortalities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 318 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bangladesh 3 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Unknown 314 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 80 25%
Student > Bachelor 38 12%
Researcher 33 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 8%
Student > Postgraduate 23 7%
Other 55 17%
Unknown 64 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 76 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 61 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 15 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 4%
Other 52 16%
Unknown 79 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,478,905
of 6,267,193 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#73
of 174 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,641
of 159,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#2
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,267,193 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 174 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 159,099 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.