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Leptin and adiponectin DNA methylation levels in adipose tissues and blood cells are associated with BMI, waist girth and LDL-cholesterol levels in severely obese men and women

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genetics, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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8 tweeters

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

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95 Mendeley
Title
Leptin and adiponectin DNA methylation levels in adipose tissues and blood cells are associated with BMI, waist girth and LDL-cholesterol levels in severely obese men and women
Published in
BMC Medical Genetics, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12881-015-0174-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrée-Anne Houde, Cécilia Légaré, Simon Biron, Odette Lescelleur, Laurent Biertho, Simon Marceau, André Tchernof, Marie-Claude Vohl, Marie-France Hivert, Luigi Bouchard

Abstract

Leptin (LEP) and adiponectin (ADIPOQ) genes encode adipokines that are mainly secreted by adipose tissues, involved in energy balance and suspected to play a role in the pathways linking adiposity to impaired glucose and insulin homeostasis. We have thus hypothesized that LEP and ADIPOQ DNA methylation changes might be involved in obesity development and its related complications. The objective of this study was to assess whether LEP and ADIPOQ DNA methylation levels measured in subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissues (VAT) are associated with anthropometric measures and metabolic profile in severely obese men and women. These analyses were repeated with DNA methylation profiles from blood cells obtained from the same individuals to determine whether they showed similarities. Paired SAT, VAT and blood samples were obtained from 73 severely obese patients undergoing a bioliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. LEP and ADIPOQ DNA methylation and mRNA levels were quantified using bisulfite-pyrosequencing and qRT-PCR respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients were computed to determine the associations between LEP and ADIPOQ DNA methylation levels, anthropometric measures and metabolic profile. DNA methylation levels at the ADIPOQ gene locus in SAT was positively associated with BMI and waist girth whereas LEP DNA methylation levels in blood cells were negatively associated with body mass index (BMI). Fasting LDL-C levels were found to be positively correlated with DNA methylation levels at LEP-CpG11 and -CpG17 in blood and SAT and with ADIPOQ DNA methylation levels in SAT (CpGE1 and CpGE3) and VAT (CpGE1). These results confirm that LEP and ADIPOQ epigenetic profiles are associated with obesity. We also report associations between LDL-C levels and both LEP and ADIPOQ DNA methylation levels suggesting that LDL-C might regulate their epigenetic profiles in adipose tissues. Furthermore, similar correlations were observed between LDL-C and LEP blood DNA methylation levels suggesting a common regulatory pathway of DNA methylation in both adipose tissues and blood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 92 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 22%
Student > Master 19 20%
Student > Bachelor 17 18%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 6 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 14 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,931,271
of 11,304,556 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genetics
#110
of 666 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,291
of 213,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genetics
#9
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,304,556 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 666 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,423 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.