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Gene expression associated with white syndromes in a reef building coral, Acropora hyacinthus

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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151 Mendeley
Title
Gene expression associated with white syndromes in a reef building coral, Acropora hyacinthus
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1540-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel M Wright, Galina V Aglyamova, Eli Meyer, Mikhail V Matz

Abstract

Corals are capable of launching diverse immune defenses at the site of direct contact with pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms of this activity and the colony-wide effects of such stressors remain poorly understood. Here we compared gene expression profiles in eight healthy Acropora hyacinthus colonies against eight colonies exhibiting tissue loss commonly associated with white syndromes, all collected from a natural reef environment near Palau. Two types of tissues were sampled from diseased corals: visibly affected and apparently healthy. Tag-based RNA-Seq followed by weighted gene co-expression network analysis identified groups of co-regulated differentially expressed genes between all health states (disease lesion, apparently healthy tissues of diseased colonies, and fully healthy). Differences between healthy and diseased tissues indicate activation of several innate immunity and tissue repair pathways accompanied by reduced calcification and the switch towards metabolic reliance on stored lipids. Unaffected parts of diseased colonies, although displaying a trend towards these changes, were not significantly different from fully healthy samples. Still, network analysis identified a group of genes, suggestive of altered immunity state, that were specifically up-regulated in unaffected parts of diseased colonies. Similarity of fully healthy samples to apparently healthy parts of diseased colonies indicates that systemic effects of white syndromes on A. hyacinthus are weak, which implies that the coral colony is largely able to sustain its physiological performance despite disease. The genes specifically up-regulated in unaffected parts of diseased colonies, instead of being the consequence of disease, might be related to the originally higher susceptibility of these colonies to naturally occurring white syndromes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Slovakia 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Unknown 146 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 23%
Student > Master 24 16%
Researcher 23 15%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 19 13%
Unknown 23 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 68 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 17%
Environmental Science 21 14%
Computer Science 3 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 24 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2016.
All research outputs
#9,207,362
of 16,638,522 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,136
of 9,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,438
of 233,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,638,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,107 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them