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Career plans of primary care midwives in the Netherlands and their intentions to leave the current job

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
Title
Career plans of primary care midwives in the Netherlands and their intentions to leave the current job
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0025-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

J Catja Warmelink, Therese A Wiegers, T Paul de Cock, Evelien R Spelten, Eileen K Hutton

Abstract

In labour market policy and planning, it is important to understand the motivations of people to continue in their current job or to seek other employment. Over the last decade, besides the increasingly medical approach to pregnancy and childbirth and decreasing home births, there were additional dramatic changes and pressures on primary care midwives and midwifery care. Therefore, it is important to re-evaluate the career plans of primary care midwives and their intentions to leave their current job. All 108 primary care midwives of 20 selected midwifery care practices in the Netherlands were invited to fill out a written questionnaire with questions regarding career plans and intentions to leave. Bivariate analyses were carried out to compare career plans and work-related and personal characteristics and attitudes towards work among the group of midwives who indicated that they intended to leave their current job (ITL group) and those who indicated they had no intention to leave (NITL group). Significant predictors of ITL were included in the multiple binary logistic regression with 'intention to leave' as the dependent variable. In 2010, 32.7% of the 98 participating primary care midwives surveyed had considered an intention to leave their current type of job in the past year. Fewer ITL midwives wanted to be a self-employed practitioner with the full range of primary care tasks and work full-time. Significant predictors of the primary care midwives' intention to leave included a lower overall score on the job satisfaction scale (OR = 0.18; 95% CI = 0.06-0.58; p = 0.004) and being between 30 and 45 years old (OR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.04-7.0; p = 0.041). Our study shows that, despite significant changes in the reproductive, maternal and newborn health service delivery that impact on independent midwifery practice, the majority of primary care midwives intended to stay in primary care. The absence of job satisfaction, and being in the age group between 30 and 45 years old, is associated with primary care midwives' intention to leave their current job. Ongoing monitoring will be important in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 40 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Student > Master 7 17%
Unspecified 6 14%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 24%
Unspecified 8 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 12%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Other 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2015.
All research outputs
#1,155,466
of 5,119,801 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#203
of 398 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,872
of 161,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#19
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,119,801 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 398 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,018 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.