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Under the banyan tree - exclusion and inclusion of people with mental disorders in rural North India

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2015
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Citations

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78 Mendeley
Title
Under the banyan tree - exclusion and inclusion of people with mental disorders in rural North India
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1778-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaaren Mathias, Michelle Kermode, Miguel San Sebastian, Mirja Koschorke, Isabel Goicolea

Abstract

Social exclusion is both cause and consequence of mental disorders. People with mental disorders (PWMD) are among the most socially excluded in all societies yet little is known about their experiences in North India. This qualitative study aims to describe experiences of exclusion and inclusion of PWMD in two rural communities in Uttar Pradesh, India. In-depth interviews with 20 PWMD and eight caregivers were carried out in May 2013. Interviews probed experiences of help-seeking, stigma, discrimination, exclusion, participation, agency and inclusion in their households and communities. Qualitative content analysis was used to generate codes, categories and finally 12 key themes. A continuum of exclusion was the dominant experience for participants, ranging from nuanced distancing, negative judgements and social isolation, and self-stigma to overt acts of exclusion such as ridicule, disinheritance and physical violence. Mixed in with this however, some participants described a sense of belonging, opportunity for participation and support from both family and community members. These findings underline the urgent need for initiatives that increase mental health literacy, access to services and social inclusion of PWMD in North India, and highlight the possibilities of using human rights frameworks in situations of physical and economic violence. The findings also highlight the urgent need to reduce stigma and take actions in policy and at all levels in society to increase inclusion of people with mental distress and disorders.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 19%
Unspecified 11 14%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Other 22 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 28%
Unspecified 16 21%
Social Sciences 13 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Other 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,215,720
of 5,067,557 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,179
of 5,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,306
of 161,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#194
of 209 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,067,557 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,708 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 209 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.