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State-building and human resources for health in fragile and conflict-affected states: exploring the linkages

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
25 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
Title
State-building and human resources for health in fragile and conflict-affected states: exploring the linkages
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0023-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Witter, Jean-Benoit Falisse, Maria Paola Bertone, Alvaro Alonso-Garbayo, João S Martins, Ahmad Shah Salehi, Enrico Pavignani, Tim Martineau

Abstract

Human resources for health are self-evidently critical to running a health service and system. There is, however, a wider set of social issues which is more rarely considered. One area which is hinted at in literature, particularly on fragile and conflict-affected states, but rarely examined in detail, is the contribution which health staff may or do play in relation to the wider state-building processes. This article aims to explore that relationship, developing a conceptual framework to understand what linkages might exist and looking for empirical evidence in the literature to support, refute or adapt those linkages. An open call for contributions to the article was launched through an online community. The group then developed a conceptual framework and explored a variety of literatures (political, economic, historical, public administration, conflict and health-related) to find theoretical and empirical evidence related to the linkages outlined in the framework. Three country case reports were also developed for Afghanistan, Burundi and Timor-Leste, using secondary sources and the knowledge of the group. We find that the empirical evidence for most of the linkages is not strong, which is not surprising, given the complexity of the relationships. Nevertheless, some of the posited relationships are plausible, especially between development of health cadres and a strengthened public administration, which in the long run underlies a number of state-building features. The reintegration of factional health staff post-conflict is also plausibly linked to reconciliation and peace-building. The role of medical staff as part of national elites may also be important. The concept of state-building itself is highly contested, with a rich vein of scepticism about the wisdom or feasibility of this as an external project. While recognizing the inherently political nature of these processes, systems and sub-systems, it remains the case that state-building does occur over time, driven by a combination of internal and external forces and that understanding the role played in it by the health system and health staff, particularly after conflicts and in fragile settings, is an area worth further investigation. This review and framework contribute to that debate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 100 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 25%
Researcher 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Other 10 10%
Unspecified 9 9%
Other 30 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 32%
Social Sciences 23 23%
Unspecified 16 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 13%
Arts and Humanities 4 4%
Other 13 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2017.
All research outputs
#789,804
of 12,914,645 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#75
of 690 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,659
of 228,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,914,645 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 690 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,536 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them