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A returning migrant worker with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in Guizhou, China: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, May 2015
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Title
A returning migrant worker with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in Guizhou, China: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13256-015-0580-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dingming Wang, Guangpeng Tang, Yan Huang, Chun Yu, Shijun Li, Li Zhuang, Lin Fu, Shiping Wang, Nanshi Li, Xiyan Li, Lei Yang, Yu Lan, Tian Bai, Yuelong Shu

Abstract

Human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus was first reported on March, 2013 in the Yangtze River Delta region of China. The majority of human cases were detected in mainland China; other regions out of mainland China reported imported human cases, including Hong Kong SAR, Taiwan (the Republic of China) and Malaysia, due to human transportation. Here, we report the first human case of H7N9 infection imported into Guizhou Province during the Spring Festival travel season in January 2014. In early January 2014, a 38-year-old healthy Chinese man, a migrant worker returning from previously H7N9-affected Zhejiang Province, was identified as the first human case of infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in Guizhou Province. He developed fever in Zhejiang at the beginning of January 2014, and returned to Guizhou for the Chinese New Year the next day. He went to seek medical care, but deteriorated rapidly and died on day 8 after his illness onset. The influenza virus A/Guizhou/01502/2014 isolated from the patient had 99% identity with viruses circulating in the Yangtze River Delta region. Selected amino acids substitutions, well-known to be associated with mammalian adaptation, viral replication and drug resistance were similar to other H7N9 viruses circulating in humans. Epidemiology investigation and laboratory results confirmed it was the first imported case of H7N9 infection in Guizhou Province. This finding further indicated that more human H7N9 cases may be detected in other regions due to frequent travel both domestically and internationally.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Researcher 6 23%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Unspecified 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 15%
Unspecified 3 12%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Other 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2015.
All research outputs
#10,688,864
of 12,053,545 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1,497
of 1,954 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,977
of 229,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#21
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,053,545 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,954 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.