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Prevalence of malnutrition among HIV-infected children in Central and West-African HIV-care programmes supported by the Growing Up Programme in 2011: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2015
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85 Mendeley
Title
Prevalence of malnutrition among HIV-infected children in Central and West-African HIV-care programmes supported by the Growing Up Programme in 2011: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0952-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie Jesson, David Masson, Arsène Adonon, Caroline Tran, Capitoline Habarugira, Réjane Zio, Léoncie Nicimpaye, Sophie Desmonde, Goreth Serurakuba, Rosine Kwayep, Edith Sare, Tiefing Konate, Abdoulaye Nimaga, Philemon Saina, Akossiwa Kpade, Andrée Bassuka, Gustave Gougouyor, Valériane Leroy

Abstract

The burden of malnutrition among HIV-infected children is not well described in sub-Saharan Africa, even though it is an important problem to take into account to guarantee appropriate healthcare for these children. We assessed the prevalence of malnutrition and its associated factors among HIV-infected children in HIV care programmes in Central and West-Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to December 2011 among the active files of HIV-infected children aged 2-19 years old, enrolled in HIV-care programmes supported by the Sidaction Growing Up Programme in Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Chad and Togo. Socio-demographics characteristics, anthropometric, clinical data, and nutritional support were collected. Anthropometric indicators, expressed in Z-scores, were used to define malnutrition: Height-for-age (HAZ), Weight-for-Height (WHZ) for children < 5 years and BMI-for-age (BAZ) for children ≥5 years. Three types of malnutrition were defined: acute malnutrition (WHZ/BAZ < -2 SD and HAZ ≥ -2 SD), chronic malnutrition (HAZ < -2 SD and WHZ/BAZ ≥ -2 SD) and mixed malnutrition (WHZ/BAZ < -2 SD and HAZ < -2 SD). A multinomial logistic regression model explored associated factors with each type of malnutrition. Overall, 1350 HIV-infected children were included; their median age was 10 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 7-13 years), 49 % were girls. 80 % were on antiretroviral treatment (ART), for a median time of 36 months. The prevalence of malnutrition was 42 % (95 % confidence interval [95% CI]: 40-44 %) with acute, chronic and mixed malnutrition at 9 % (95% CI: 6-12 %), 26 % (95% CI: 23-28 %), and 7 % (95% CI: 5-10 %), respectively. Among those malnourished, more than half of children didn't receive any nutritional support at the time of the survey. Acute malnutrition was associated with male gender, severe immunodeficiency, and the absence of ART; chronic malnutrition with male gender and age (<5 years); and mixed malnutrition with male gender, age (<5 years), severe immunodeficiency and recent ART initiation (<6 months). Orphanhood and Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis were not associated with any type of malnutrition. The prevalence of malnutrition in HIV-infected children even on ART remains high in HIV care programmes. Anthropometric measurements and appropriate nutritional care of malnourished HIV-infected children remain insufficient and a priority to improve health care of HIV-infected children in Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 1%
Unknown 83 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 32%
Student > Postgraduate 17 20%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Other 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 16%
Unspecified 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 12 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,583,213
of 5,214,547 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,357
of 2,746 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,069
of 173,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#45
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,214,547 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,746 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,510 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.