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Job and life satisfaction and preference of future practice locations of physicians on remote islands in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
Title
Job and life satisfaction and preference of future practice locations of physicians on remote islands in Japan
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0029-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshiaki Nojima, Shunichi Kumakura, Keiichi Onoda, Tsuyoshi Hamano, Kiyoshi Kimura

Abstract

The objective of this research is to investigate job and life satisfaction and preference of future practice locations of physicians in rural and remote islands in Japan. A cross-sectional study was conducted for physicians who reside or resided on the Oki islands: isolated islands situated in the Sea of Japan between the Eurasian continent and the mainland of Japan. A questionnaire was sent to physicians on the Oki islands to evaluate physician satisfaction regarding job environment, career development, living conditions, salary, and support by local government. Data was analysed for 49 physicians; 47 were male and 2 were female, and the mean ± SD age was 44.3 ± 10.9 years. Among the variables related to physicians' satisfaction, most of the physicians (>90%) were satisfied with "team work" and "salary". On the other hand, the majority of physicians (approximately 70%) were not satisfied with the "opportunity to continue professional development". Age ≥50 years, graduates of medical schools other than Jichi Medical University (established in 1972 with the aim to produce rural physicians) self-selected the Oki islands as a practice location, and satisfaction in "work as a doctor", "opportunity to consult with peers about patients", "relationship with people in the community", and "acceptance by community" were found to be significant factors influencing the choice of the Oki islands as a future practice location. Factors influencing future practice locations on the remote islands were included in a self-reported questionnaire which illustrated the importance of factors that impact both the spouses and children of physicians. Improving work satisfaction, providing outreach support programmes for career development and professional support in rural practice, and building appropriate relationships between physicians and people in the community, which can in turn improve work satisfaction, may contribute to physicians' choices of practising medicine on rural and remote islands in Japan. Addressing family issues is also crucial in encouraging the choice of a rural medical practice location.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 27%
Researcher 6 20%
Other 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Other 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 40%
Unspecified 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Other 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,055,900
of 5,229,325 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#291
of 404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,631
of 173,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#29
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,229,325 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 60th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,736 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.