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Human resource crises in German hospitals—an explorative study

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
Title
Human resource crises in German hospitals—an explorative study
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0032-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carsten C Schermuly, Michael Draheim, Ronald Glasberg, Vladimir Stantchev, Gerrit Tamm, Michael Hartmann, Franz Hessel

Abstract

The complexity of providing medical care in a high-tech environment with a highly specialized, limited labour force makes hospitals more crisis-prone than other industries. An effective defence against crises is only possible if the organizational resilience and the capacity to handle crises become part of the hospitals' organizational culture. To become more resilient to crises, a raised awareness-especially in the area of human resource (HR)-is necessary. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the process robustness against crises through the identification and evaluation of relevant HR crises and their causations in hospitals. Qualitative and quantitative methods were combined to identify and evaluate crises in hospitals in the HR sector. A structured workshop with experts was conducted to identify HR crises and their descriptions, as well as causes and consequences for patients and hospitals. To evaluate the findings, an online survey was carried out to rate the occurrence (past, future) and dangerousness of each crisis. Six HR crises were identified in this study: staff shortages, acute loss of personnel following a pandemic, damage to reputation, insufficient communication during restructuring, bullying, and misuse of drugs. The highest occurrence probability in the future was seen in staff shortages, followed by acute loss of personnel following a pandemic. Staff shortages, damage to reputation, and acute loss of personnel following a pandemic were seen as the most dangerous crises. The study concludes that coping with HR crises in hospitals is existential for hospitals and requires increased awareness. The six HR crises identified occurred regularly in German hospitals in the past, and their occurrence probability for the future was rated as high.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Unspecified 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 12 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 25%
Unspecified 7 19%
Social Sciences 6 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Other 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2015.
All research outputs
#7,706,064
of 13,385,780 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#652
of 729 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,358
of 234,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,385,780 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 729 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,334 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them