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Optimizing the interprofessional workforce for centralized intake of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid disease: case study

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
Optimizing the interprofessional workforce for centralized intake of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid disease: case study
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0033-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Esther Suter, Arden Birney, Paola Charland, Renee Misfeldt, Stephen Weiss, Jane Squire Howden, Jennifer Hendricks, Theresa Lupton, Deborah Marshall

Abstract

This case study was part of a larger programme of research in Alberta that aims to develop an evidence-based model to optimize centralized intake province-wide to improve access to care. A centralized intake model places all referred patients on waiting lists based on severity and then directs them to the most appropriate provider or service. Our research focused on an in-depth assessment of two well-established models currently in place in Alberta to 1) enhance our understanding of the roles and responsibilities of staff in current intake processes, 2) identify workforce issues and opportunities within the current models, and 3) inform the potential use of alternative providers in the proposed centralized intake model. Our case study included two centralized intake models in Alberta associated with three clinics. One model involved one clinic that focuses on rheumatoid disease. The other model involved two clinics that focus on osteoarthritis. We completed a document review and interviews with managers and staff from both models. Finally, we reviewed the scope of practice regulations for a range of health-care providers to examine their suitability to contribute to the centralized intake process of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid disease. Interview findings from both models suggested a need for an electronic medical record and eReferral system to improve the efficiency of the current process and reduce staff workload. Staff interviewed also spoke of the need to have a permanent musculoskeletal screener available to streamline the intake process for osteoarthritis patients. Both models relied on registered nurses, medical office assistants, and physicians throughout their intake process. Our scope of practice review revealed that several providers have the competencies to screen, assess, and provide case management at different junctures in the centralized intake of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid disease. Using a broader range of providers in the centralized intake of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid disease has the potential to improve access and care specifically related to the assessment and management of patients. This may enhance the patient care experience and address current access issues.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 38%
Unspecified 8 20%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 33%
Unspecified 10 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 8%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2015.
All research outputs
#6,742,191
of 12,819,635 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#548
of 687 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,164
of 232,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,819,635 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 687 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them