↓ Skip to main content

Severe malaria in children leads to a significant impairment of transitory otoacoustic emissions - a prospective multicenter cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Severe malaria in children leads to a significant impairment of transitory otoacoustic emissions - a prospective multicenter cohort study
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0366-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joachim Schmutzhard, Peter Lackner, Raimund Helbok, Helene Verena Hurth, Fabian Cedric Aregger, Veronika Muigg, Josua Kegele, Sebastian Bunk, Lukas Oberhammer, Natalie Fischer, Leyla Pinggera, Allan Otieno, Bernards Ogutu, Tsiri Agbenyega, Daniel Ansong, Ayola A. Adegnika, Saadou Issifou, Patrick Zorowka, Sanjeev Krishna, Benjamin Mordmüller, Erich Schmutzhard, Peter Kremsner

Abstract

Severe malaria may influence inner ear function, although this possibility has not been examined prospectively. In a retrospective analysis, hearing impairment was found in 9 of 23 patients with cerebral malaria. An objective method to quickly evaluate the function of the inner ear are the otoacoustic emissions. Negative transient otoacoustic emissions are associated with a threshold shift of 20 dB and above. This prospective multicenter study analyses otoacoustic emissions in patients with severe malaria up to the age of 10 years. In three study sites (Ghana, Gabon, Kenya) 144 patients with severe malaria and 108 control children were included. All malaria patients were treated with parental artesunate. In the control group, 92.6 % (n = 108, 95 % confidence interval 86.19-6.2 %) passed otoacoustic emission screening. In malaria patients, 58.5 % (n = 94, malaria vs controls p < 0.001, 95 % confidence interval 48.4-67.9 %) passed otoacoustic emission screening at the baseline measurement. The value increased to 65.2 % (n = 66, p < 0.001, 95 % confidence interval 53.1-75.5 %) at follow up 14-28 days after diagnosis of malaria. The study population was divided into severe non-cerebral malaria and severe malaria with neurological symptoms (cerebral malaria). Whereas otoacoustic emissions in severe malaria improved to a passing percentage of 72.9 % (n = 48, 95 % confidence interval 59-83.4 %) at follow-up, the patients with cerebral malaria showed a drop in the passing percentage to 33 % (n = 18) 3-7 days after diagnosis. This shows a significant impairment in the cerebral malaria group (p = 0.012 at days 3-7, 95 % confidence interval 16.3-56.3 %; p = 0.031 at day 14-28, 95 % confidence interval 24.5-66.3 %). The presented data show that 40 % of children have involvement of the inner ear early in severe malaria. In children, audiological screening after severe malaria infection is not currently recommended, but is worth investigating in larger studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Portugal 1 3%
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 36 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 7 18%
Student > Master 5 13%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 10 26%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 54%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,837,876
of 12,079,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,321
of 1,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,909
of 230,969 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#69
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,079,889 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,928 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.2. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,969 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.