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Weight change following knee and hip joint arthroplasty–a six-month prospective study of adults with osteoarthritis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Weight change following knee and hip joint arthroplasty–a six-month prospective study of adults with osteoarthritis
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12891-015-0598-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew J Teichtahl, Emma Quirk, Paula Harding, Anne E Holland, Clare Delany, Rana S Hinman, Anita E Wluka, Susan M Liew, Flavia M Cicuttini

Abstract

Inconsistent findings of weight change following total knee (TKA) and hip (THA) arthroplasty may largely be attributable to heterogeneous cohorts and varied definitions of weight loss. This study examined weight change following TKA and THA for osteoarthritis (OA). 64 participants with hip or knee OA were recruited from orthopaedic joint arthroplasty waiting lists at a single major Australian public hospital between March and October 2011. The Short Form (SF) 12 survey was used to assess baseline physical and mental functioning. 49 participants completed 6 month follow-up (20 from the THA group and 29 from the TKA group). The majority of subjects lost weight (>0 kg) 6 months following THA (70 %) and TKA (58.6 %). When at least a 5 % reduction in total body weight was used to define clinically significant weight loss, the proportion of people with weight loss was 37.9 % for TKA and 25 % for THA. Greater weight loss occurred 6 months following TKA compared with THA (7.2 % versus 3.7 % of body weight; p = 0.04). Worse pre-operative physical functioning (SF-12) was associated with greater weight loss following TKA (β = 0.22 kg, 95 % CI 0.02-0.42 kg; p = 0.04). Most people lost weight (>0 kg) 6 months following TKA and THA and a considerable proportion of people achieved ≥5 % loss of body weight. The magnitude of weight loss was greater following TKA than THA, with worse pre-operative function being a predictor of more weight loss. Further attention to weight management is required to assist a greater number of people to achieve a larger magnitude of weight loss following knee and hip joint arthroplasty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 28%
Unspecified 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Master 4 10%
Librarian 3 8%
Other 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 49%
Unspecified 8 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,078,928
of 7,168,681 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#911
of 1,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,293
of 216,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#19
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,168,681 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,934 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,109 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.