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GLP-I secretion in healthy and diabetic Wistar rats in response to aqueous extract of Momordica charantia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2018
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Title
GLP-I secretion in healthy and diabetic Wistar rats in response to aqueous extract of Momordica charantia
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12906-018-2227-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gulzar Ahmad Bhat, Haseeb A. Khan, Abdullah S. Alhomida, Poonam Sharma, Rambir Singh, Bilal Ahmad Paray

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is one of the major global health disorders increasing at an alarming rate in both developed and developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of aqueous extract of Momordica charantia (AEMC) on fasting blood glucose (FBG), tissue glycogen, glycosylated haemoglobin, plasma concentrations of insulin and GLP-1 hormone (glucagon-like peptide 1) in healthy and diabetic wistar rats. Male Wistar rats (both normal and diabetic) were treated with AEMC by gavaging (300 mg/kg body wt/day for 28 days). AEMC was found to increase tissue glycogen, serum insulin and GLP-1 non-significantly (P > 0.05) in normal, significantly (P < 0.01) in diabetic Wistar rats, whereas decrease in FBG and Glycosylated haemoglobin non-significantly (P > 0.05) in normal, significantly (P < 0.01) in diabetic Wistar rats. The elevation of GLP-1 level in normal and diabetic treated groups may be due to the L-cell regeneration and proliferation by binding with L-cell receptors and makes a conformational change, resulting in the activation of a series of signal transducers. The polar molecules of M. charantia also depolarize the L-cell through elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and which in turn releases GLP-1. GLP-1 in turn elevates beta-cell proliferation and insulin secretion. The findings tend to provide a possible explanation for the hypoglycemic action of M. charantia fruit extracts as alternative nutritional therapy in the management and treatment of diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 33%
Professor 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2018.
All research outputs
#9,925,304
of 12,968,481 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,650
of 2,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,621
of 271,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,968,481 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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