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Genetic and epidemiological analysis of norovirus from children with gastroenteritis in Botswana, 2013–2015

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2018
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Title
Genetic and epidemiological analysis of norovirus from children with gastroenteritis in Botswana, 2013–2015
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3157-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kgomotso Makhaola, Sikhulile Moyo, Kwana Lechiile, David M. Goldfarb, Lemme P. Kebaabetswe

Abstract

Norovirus is a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide with a peak of disease seen in children. The epidemiological analysis regarding the virus strains in Africa is limited. The first report of norovirus in Botswana was in 2010 and currently, the prevalence and circulating genotypes of norovirus are unknown, as the country has no systems to report the norovirus cases. This study investigated the prevalence, patterns and molecular characteristics of norovirus infections among children ≤5 years of age admitted with acute gastroenteritis at four hospitals in Botswana. A total of 484 faecal samples were collected from children who were admitted with acute gastroenteritis during the rotavirus vaccine impact survey between July 2013 and December 2015. Norovirus was detected using real-time RT-PCR. Positive samples were genotyped using conventional RT-PCR followed by partial sequencing of the capsid and RdRp genes. Norovirus strains were determined by nucleotide sequence analysis using the online Norovirus Genotyping Tool Version 1.0, and confirmed using maximum likelihood tree construction as implemented in MEGA 6.0. The prevalence of norovirus was 9.3% (95% CI 6.7-11.9). The genotype diversity was dominated by the GII.4 strain at 69.7%. This was followed by GII.2, GII.12 each at 9.1%, GI.9 at 6.6% and GII.6, GII.10 each at 3.0%. The most common combined RdRp/Capsid genotype was the GII.Pe/GII.4 Sydney 2012. Norovirus was detected during most part of the year; however, there was a preponderance of cases in the wet season (December to March). The study showed a possible decline of norovirus infections in the last 10 years since the first report. An upward trend seen between 2013 and 2015 may be attributable to the success of rotavirus vaccine introductions in 2012. Knowledge of circulating genotypes, seasonal trends and overall prevalence is critical for prevention programming and possible future vaccine design implications.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 33%
Unspecified 3 25%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2018.
All research outputs
#11,581,895
of 13,034,624 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,157
of 4,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#235,308
of 271,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
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