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Gender differences of foot characteristics in older Japanese adults using a 3D foot scanner

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
Title
Gender differences of foot characteristics in older Japanese adults using a 3D foot scanner
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13047-015-0087-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mahshid Saghazadeh, Naruki Kitano, Tomohiro Okura

Abstract

Knowledge of gender differences in foot shape assists shoe manufactures with designing appropriate shoes for men and women. Although gender differences in foot shapes are relatively known among young men and women, less is known about how the older men and women's feet differ in shape. A recent development in foot shape assessment is the use of 3D foot scanners. To our knowledge this technology has yet to be used to examine gender differences in foot shape of Japanese older adults. This cross-sectional study included 151 older men (74.5 ± 5.6 years) and 140 older women (73.9 ± 5.1 years) recruited in Kasama City, Japan. Foot variables were measured in sitting and standing positions using Dream GP Incorporated's 3D foot scanner, Footstep PRO (Osaka, Japan). Scores were analyzed as both raw and normalized to truncated foot length using independent samples t-test and analysis of covariance, respectively. In men, the measurement values for navicular height, first and fifth toe and instep heights, ball and heel width, ball girth, arch height index (just standing), arch rigidity index and instep girth were significantly greater than the women's, whereas the first toe angle, in both sitting and standing positions was significantly smaller. However, after normalizing, the differences in ball width, heel width, height of first and fifth toes in both sitting and standing and ball girth in sitting position were nonsignificant. According to Cohen's d, among all the foot variables, the following had large effect sizes in both sitting and standing positions: truncated foot length, instep, navicular height, foot length, ball girth, ball width, heel width and instep girth. This study provides evidence of anthropometric foot variations between older men and women. These differences need to be considered when manufacturing shoes for older adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 22%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Master 5 11%
Other 14 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Sports and Recreations 5 11%
Engineering 5 11%
Other 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2016.
All research outputs
#7,239,639
of 13,417,362 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#390
of 542 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,400
of 235,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,417,362 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 542 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them