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Access to primary care is associated with better autoimmune hepatitis outcomes in an urban county hospital

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
Title
Access to primary care is associated with better autoimmune hepatitis outcomes in an urban county hospital
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12876-015-0318-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Kim, Daniel Eshtiaghpour, Joel Alpern, Anuj Datta, Viktor E. Eysselein, Hal F. Yee

Abstract

Autoimmune hepatitis causes chronic hepatitis and often leads to cirrhosis and death without treatment. We wanted to see if having access to primary care or insurance prior to diagnosis is associated with better outcomes for patients in an urban, public hospital with mostly socioeconomically disadvantaged Hispanic patients. We did a retrospective study at our institution. Kaplan Meier survival analysis was done looking at transplant-free overall survival for patients diagnosed at our institution. The log-rank test was done to compare survival between patients with and without prior access to primary care, and between patients with and without insurance at diagnosis. Overall 5- and 10-year transplant-free overall survival was 91 % (95 % CI, 83-100 %) and 75 % (95 % CI, 50-99 %), respectively. Patients with primary care prior to diagnosis had significantly better transplant-free overall survival than those without (log rank test p = 0.019). Patients with primary care also had better clinical markers at diagnosis. Having insurance at diagnosis was not associated with better outcomes. Outcomes of autoimmune hepatitis are poor in our setting but access to primary care prior to diagnosis was associated with better outcomes. This is likely due to the important role that primary care plays in detecting disease and initiating treatment earlier. With the expansion of access to healthcare that the Affordable Care Act provides, future patients are likely to do better with even rare diseases like autoimmune hepatitis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 24%
Student > Master 4 24%
Other 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Other 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 41%
Social Sciences 3 18%
Unspecified 2 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 12%
Arts and Humanities 1 6%
Other 2 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2016.
All research outputs
#809,081
of 7,695,064 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#51
of 683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,455
of 227,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#3
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,695,064 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 683 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,128 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.