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The longitudinal age and birth cohort trends of regular exercise among adults aged 16–63 years in Sweden: a 24-year follow-up study

Overview of attention for article published in Population Health Metrics, July 2015
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Title
The longitudinal age and birth cohort trends of regular exercise among adults aged 16–63 years in Sweden: a 24-year follow-up study
Published in
Population Health Metrics, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12963-015-0049-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matti Leijon, Patrik Midlöv, Jan Sundquist, Kristina Sundquist, Sven-Erik Johansson

Abstract

The aim of this study is to analyze longitudinally, based on four measurements at intervals of eight years, the annual effect of age group and birth cohort on regular exercise in the Swedish population from 1980-1981 to 2004-2005. We followed a randomly drawn subsample of individuals aged 16-63 years, interviewed by professional interviewers, from the Swedish Annual Level of Living Survey. We applied a mixed model with a random intercept and a random slope in order to analyze the annual effects. The prevalence of regular exercise increased annually by 0.3 % among men and 0.7 % among women. For every one-unit increase in BMI, the odds of regular physical activity decreased by 6 % among men and 5 % among women. While the female birth cohorts all increased over time the male birth cohorts showed a different pattern, as only the three oldest birth cohorts (1926-1933, 1934-1941, 1942-1949) showed an increase in regular exercise. The three youngest birth cohorts (1958-1965, 1966-1973, 1974-1981) instead showed a decreased prevalence of regular exercise. There was an inverse relationship between regular exercise and age, although the differences between age groups tended to decrease over time. Differences related to educational level increased over time as the prevalence of exercise among those with higher educational attainment increased more than among those with lower educational attainment. The most dramatic relative increase in exercise over time (almost two-fold) was found among those who were obese or who reported a poor health status. The prevalence of regular exercise increased in all studied sub-groups. However, the increased difference related to education level is worrying. To reduce the risk for ill health in these groups, there is a need for targeted interventions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 24%
Unspecified 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Student > Master 2 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Other 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 24%
Sports and Recreations 3 18%
Social Sciences 2 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Other 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2015.
All research outputs
#9,073,501
of 11,333,579 outputs
Outputs from Population Health Metrics
#216
of 263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,228
of 235,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Population Health Metrics
#9
of 10 outputs
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