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Placebo by proxy expectations toward acupuncture change over time: a survey comparing parental expectations to acupuncture pre- and postoperatively

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2018
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Title
Placebo by proxy expectations toward acupuncture change over time: a survey comparing parental expectations to acupuncture pre- and postoperatively
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12906-018-2248-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ingrid Liodden, Are Hugo Pripp, Arne Johan Norheim

Abstract

Patients entering a treatment have expectancy to outcome based on their previous experience, the information received, and the credibility of the treatment. Once the treatment has started, patients may detect and interpret contextual cues and somatic state. Influenced and conditioned by positive or negative interpretations, their reappraisal may improve or worsen the treatment outcome. The aims were to investigate whether parental pre-treatment expectancies towards acupuncture differ compared to post-treatment expectancies, and assess predictors for possible change of parental expectancy. Further, we wanted to explore whether the change correlates with the treatment outcome, i.e. postoperative vomiting in children. Two hundred and eighty-two parents completed per- and 24 h postoperatively a survey on their expectancy to acupuncture treatment for alleviation of postoperative vomiting in children. The survey was embedded in a randomised controlled trial. Parental expectancy to acupuncture treatment changed over time. The changes were predicted by several variables such as children's gender, parents' age and education, previous experiences, and assignment to treatment group. The strongest predictor was parental anxiety to their child undergoing surgery. Further, the change of parental expectancy was correlated with postoperative vomiting. Anxious parents are prone to change their expectancy in a positive direction during the treatment period, which in turn may improve treatment outcome. Acupuncture therapists in clinical practice should pay a special attention to the potential that lies here, and acknowledge parental anxiety as a possible facilitator, and not a barrier, to elicit placebo by proxy effects. Further research to expand the findings of the present study into other treatments is in order. Future research should also provide more knowledge about how parental expectancy changes over time, and how different factors predict and produce change of parental expectancy. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01729052 . Registered November 20, 2012.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Other 6 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Psychology 3 14%
Arts and Humanities 2 10%
Other 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,012,845
of 13,090,338 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,657
of 2,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,509
of 270,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
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