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Maternal personality disorder symptoms in primary health care: associations with mother–toddler interactions at one-year follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, June 2018
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Title
Maternal personality disorder symptoms in primary health care: associations with mother–toddler interactions at one-year follow-up
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12888-018-1789-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Magnhild Singstad Høivik, Stian Lydersen, Ingunn Ranøyen, Turid Suzanne Berg-Nielsen

Abstract

Research is scarce on how mothers' symptoms of personality disorders are linked to the mother-toddler relationship. In this study we have explored the extent to which these symptoms are associated with mutual mother-toddler interactions assessed 1 year after the initial assessment. Mothers and their 0-24-month-old children (n = 112) were recruited by nurses at well-baby clinics due to either self-reported or observed mother-toddler interaction problems. At inclusion (T1), mothers filled out the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q), which measures symptoms of ten personality disorders. A year later (T2), mother-toddler interactions were video-recorded and coded using a standardised observation measure, the Emotional Availability Scales. Only maternal schizotypal personality disorder symptoms predicted both the mothers' and the toddlers' interactional styles. Mothers with schizotypal personality symptoms appeared less sensitive, less structuring and more intrusive in their interactions with their toddlers, while mothers' borderline personality disorder symptoms were associated with increased hostility. Furthermore, toddlers who had mothers with schizotypal personality symptoms were less responsive towards their mothers. Measured dimensionally by self-report, maternal schizotypal personality symptoms were observed to predict the interaction styles of both mothers and their toddlers in the dyad, while borderline personality disorder symptoms predicted mothers' interactional behaviour only. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN99793905 , retrospectively registered. Registered on (04/08/2014).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 31%
Psychology 5 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,443,032
of 13,099,076 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,540
of 3,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,279
of 270,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
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