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Cognitive-Behavioural therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for the treatment of post-natal depression: a narrative review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, June 2018
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Title
Cognitive-Behavioural therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for the treatment of post-natal depression: a narrative review
Published in
BMC Psychology, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40359-018-0240-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

George Stamou, Azucena García-Palacios, Cristina Botella

Abstract

Post-natal Depression (PND) is a depressive disorder that causes significant distress or impairment on different levels in the individual's life and their families. There is already evidence of the efficacy of psychological treatments for PND. We conducted a narrative review and researched the literature for identifying systematic reviews and studies for the best psychological treatments of PND, and examined what parameters made those treatments successful. We searched 4 electronic databases. We included reviews and randomised controlled clinical trials for our research. We excluded other types of studies such as case studies and cohort studies. We followed a specific search strategy with specific terms and a selection process. We identified risk of bias in reviews and studies, and identified their limitations. We synthesized the data based on particular information, including: name of the authors, location, research type, target, population, delivery, outcome measures, participants, control groups, types of intervention, components of treatments, providers, experimental conditions amongst others. We found 6 reviews and 15 studies which met our inclusion criteria focusing on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PND. Among the main findings we found that CBT can be delivered on an individual basis or within a group. It can be effective in the short-term, or up to six months post-intervention. CBT can be delivered by professionals or experts, but can also be practiced by non-experts. We found 7 components of CBT, including psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, and goal setting. We also researched whether virtual reality (VR) has ever been used for the treatment of PND, and found that it has not. From our review, we have concluded that CBT is an effective treatment for PND. We have explored the utility of VR as a possible therapeutic modality for PND and have decided to run a pilot feasibility study as a next step, which will act as the foundational guide for a clinical trial at a later stage.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Student > Master 8 16%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 33%
Unspecified 15 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 12%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,018,889
of 13,104,802 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#258
of 285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,954
of 268,217 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
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