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Who benefit from school doctors’ health checks: a prospective study of a screening method

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
Title
Who benefit from school doctors’ health checks: a prospective study of a screening method
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3295-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kirsi Nikander, Silja Kosola, Minna Kaila, Elina Hermanson

Abstract

School health services provide an excellent opportunity for the detection and treatment of children at risk of later health problems. However, the optimal use of school doctors' skills and expertise remains unknown. Furthermore, no validated method for screening children for school doctors' assessments exists. The aims of the study are 1) to evaluate the benefits or harm of school doctors' routine health checks in primary school grades 1 and 5 (at ages 7 and 11) and 2) to explore whether some of the school doctors' routine health checks can be omitted using study questionnaires. This is a prospective, multicenter observational study conducted in four urban municipalities in Southern Finland by comparing the need for a school doctor's assessment to the benefit gained from it. We will recruit a random sample of 1050 children from 21 schools from primary school grades 1 and 5. Before the school doctor's health check, parents, nurses and teachers fill a study questionnaire to identify any potential concerns about each child. Doctors, blinded to the questionnaire responses, complete an electronic report after the appointment, including given instructions and follow-up plans. The child, parent, doctor and researchers assess the benefit of the health check. The researchers compare the need for a doctor's appointment to the benefit gained from it. At one year after the health check, we will analyze the implementation of the doctors' interventions and follow-up plans. The study will increase our knowledge of the benefits of school doctors' routine health checks and assess the developed screening method. We hypothesize that targeting the health checks to the children in greatest need would increase the quality of school health services. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03178331 , date of registration June 6 th 2017.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 25%
Unspecified 2 25%
Other 1 13%
Researcher 1 13%
Librarian 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 25%
Sports and Recreations 1 13%
Social Sciences 1 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 13%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2018.
All research outputs
#3,379,764
of 13,187,018 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,629
of 4,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,963
of 268,555 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,187,018 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,397 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,555 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them