↓ Skip to main content

Women’s reasons for, and experiences of, choosing a homebirth following a caesarean section

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
19 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
Title
Women’s reasons for, and experiences of, choosing a homebirth following a caesarean section
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0639-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hazel Keedle, Virginia Schmied, Elaine Burns, Hannah G Dahlen

Abstract

Caesarean section is rising in the developed world and vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) is declining. There are increased reports of women seeking a homebirth following a caesarean section (HBAC) in Australia but little is known about the reasons for this study aimed to explore women's reasons for and experiences of choosing a HBAC. Twelve women participated in a semi-structured one-to-one interview. The interviews were digitally recorded, then transcribed verbatim. These data were analysed using thematic analysis. The overarching theme that emerged was 'It's never happening again'. Women clearly articulated why it [caesarean section] was never happening again under the following sub themes: 'treated like a piece of meat', 'I was traumatised by it for years', 'you can smell the fear in the room', 're-traumatised by the system'. They also described how it [caesarean section] was never happening again under the sub themes: 'getting informed and gaining confidence', 'avoiding judgment through selective telling', 'preparing for birth', 'gathering support' and 'all about safety but I came first'. The women then identified the impact of their HBAC under the subthemes 'I felt like superwoman' and 'there is just no comparison'. Birth intervention may cause physical and emotional trauma that can have a significant impact on some women. Inflexible hospital systems and inflexible attitudes around policy and care led some women to seek other options. Women report that achieving a HBAC has benefits for the relationship with their baby. VBAC policies and practices in hospitals need to be flexible to enable women to negotiate the care that they wish to have.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 19%
Student > Master 14 19%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 27%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Psychology 3 4%
Unspecified 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 16 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 December 2019.
All research outputs
#465,709
of 14,185,873 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#89
of 2,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,708
of 239,788 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,185,873 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,607 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,788 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them