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Th17-related cytokines: new players in the control of chronic intestinal inflammation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
Title
Th17-related cytokines: new players in the control of chronic intestinal inflammation
Published in
BMC Medicine, November 2011
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-9-122
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ivan Monteleone, Francesco Pallone, Giovanni Monteleone

Abstract

Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the main forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in man, are thought to be caused by an excessive and poorly controlled immune response that is directed against components of the normal microflora. The exact sequence of events by which this pathological process is triggered and maintained is not fully understood, but studies in experimental models of IBD and data emerging from recent clinical trials indicate that T cell-derived cytokines are crucial mediators of the tissue damage. Although CD and UC have been traditionally considered two typical examples of T helper (Th)1 or Th2-associated disease respectively, it is now known that CD- and UC-related inflammation is also marked by enhanced production of cytokines made by a distinct subset of Th cells, termed Th17 cells. Th17 cytokines can have both tissue-protective and inflammatory effects in the gut and there is evidence that Th17 cells can alter their cytokine program according to the stimuli received and convert into Th1-producing cells. These novel findings have contributed to advancing our understanding of mechanisms of gut tissue damage and open new avenues for development of therapeutic strategies in IBD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Japan 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Saudi Arabia 1 1%
Unknown 81 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 20%
Student > Master 14 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Other 8 9%
Other 26 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 33%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 13%
Unspecified 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Other 6 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2011.
All research outputs
#6,469,692
of 12,517,134 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,607
of 2,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,899
of 105,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#88
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,010 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.9. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 105,940 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.