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Aminoglycoside therapy for childhood urinary tract infection due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
Title
Aminoglycoside therapy for childhood urinary tract infection due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1153-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seung Beom Han, Sung Chul Lee, Soo Young Lee, Dae Chul Jeong, Jin Han Kang

Abstract

The rate of urinary tract infections (UTIs) due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacterial strains requiring carbapenem therapy has been increasing in children. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of non-carbapenem antibiotic therapy on childhood UTIs caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae. Medical records of children diagnosed with febrile UTIs due to E. coli or K. pneumoniae between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The enrolled children were divided into two groups: the ESBL group and the non-ESBL group. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic responses were compared between the two groups. A total of 211 episodes of UTI (204 caused by E. coli; seven caused by K. pneumoniae) were identified in 205 children. Twenty-two (10.4 %) episodes were categorized into the ESBL group. There was no significant difference in the type of antibiotic administered between the two groups. No carbapenems were administered; however, aminoglycosides were administered for 79.1 % of the total episodes. Although empirical antibiotics were appropriate for more episodes in the non-ESBL group compared with the ESBL group (100.0 % vs. 90.9 %, p = 0.011), there were no significant differences in the frequency of defervescence, bacterial eradication from the urine, acute pyelonephritis and vesicoureteral reflux or fever duration between the two groups. Non-carbapenem antibiotics showed favourable therapeutic effects on childhood UTIs caused by ESBL-producing strains. Aminoglycosides can be an alternative to carbapenems in such cases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Postgraduate 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Unspecified 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 12 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 49%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 15%
Unspecified 5 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Other 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2015.
All research outputs
#2,695,833
of 6,534,476 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,351
of 3,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,183
of 207,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#70
of 152 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,534,476 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,044 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,693 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 152 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.