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Living with and dying from advanced heart failure: understanding the needs of older patients at the end of life

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
Title
Living with and dying from advanced heart failure: understanding the needs of older patients at the end of life
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0124-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katharina Klindtworth, Peter Oster, Klaus Hager, Olaf Krause, Jutta Bleidorn, Nils Schneider

Abstract

Heart failure (HF) is a life-limiting illness and patients with advanced heart failure often suffer from severe physical and psychosocial symptoms. Particularly in older patients, HF often occurs in conjunction with other chronic diseases, resulting in complex co-morbidity. This study aims to understand how old and very old patients with advanced HF perceive their disease and to identify their medical, psychosocial and information needs, focusing on the last phase of life. Qualitative longitudinal interview study with old and very old patients (≥70 years) with severe HF (NYHA III-IV). Interviews were conducted at three-month intervals over a period of up to 18 months and were analysed using qualitative methods in relation to Grounded Theory. A total of 95 qualitative interviews with 25 patients were conducted and analysed. The following key categories were developed: (1a) dealing with advanced heart failure and ageing, (1b) dealing with end of life; (2a) perceptions regarding care, and (2b) interpersonal relations. Overall, our data show that older patients do not experience HF as a life-limiting disease. Functional restrictions and changed conditions leading to problems in daily life activities were often their prime concerns. The needs and priorities of older HF patients vary depending on their disease status and individual preferences. Pain resulting in reduced quality of life is an example of a major symptom requiring treatment. Many older HF patients lack sufficient knowledge about their condition and its prognosis, particularly concerning emergency situations and end of life issues, and many expressed a wish for open discussions. From the patients' perspective, there is a need for improvement in interaction with health care professionals, and limits in treatment and medical care are not openly discussed. Old and very old patients with advanced HF often do not acknowledge the seriousness and severity of the disease. Their communication with physicians predominantly focuses on curative treatment. Therefore, aspects such as self-management of the disease, dealing with emergency situations and end-of-life issues should be addressed more prominently. An advanced care planning (ACP) programme for heart disease in older people could be an option to improve patient-centred care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 108 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 21%
Student > Master 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 15%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 25 22%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 24%
Psychology 11 10%
Social Sciences 5 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 14 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2017.
All research outputs
#2,223,945
of 9,043,909 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#417
of 970 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,528
of 248,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#19
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,043,909 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 970 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.