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Demand-side interventions for maternal care: evidence of more use, not better outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
135 Mendeley
Title
Demand-side interventions for maternal care: evidence of more use, not better outcomes
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0727-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taylor E. Hurst, Katherine Semrau, Manasa Patna, Atul Gawande, Lisa R. Hirschhorn

Abstract

Reducing maternal and neonatal mortality is essential to improving population health. Demand-side interventions are designed to increase uptake of critical maternal health services, but associated change in service uptake and outcomes is varied. We undertook a literature review to understand current evidence of demand-side intervention impact on improving utilization and outcomes for mothers and newborn children. We completed a rapid review of literature in PubMed. Title and abstracts of publications identified from selected search terms were reviewed to identify articles meeting inclusion criteria: demand-side intervention in low or middle-income countries (LMIC), published after September 2004 and before March 2014, study design describing and reporting on >1 priority outcome: utilization (antenatal care visits, facility-based delivery, delivery with a skilled birth attendant) or health outcome measures (maternal mortality ratio (MMR), stillbirth rate, perinatal mortality rate (PMR), neonatal mortality rate (NMR)). Bibliographies were searched to identify additional relevant papers. Articles were abstracted using a standardized data collection template with double extraction on a sample to ensure quality. Quality of included studies was assessed using McMaster University's Quality Assessment Tool from the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP). Five hundred and eighty two articles were screened with 50 selected for full review and 16 meeting extraction criteria (eight community mobilization interventions (CM), seven financial incentive interventions (FI), and one with both). We found that demand-side interventions were effective in increasing uptake of key services with five CM and all seven FI interventions reporting increased use of maternal health services. Association with health outcome measures were varied with two studies reporting reductions in MMR and four reporting reduced NMR. No studies found a reduction in stillbirth rate. Only four of the ten studies reporting on both utilization and outcomes reported improvement in both measures. We found strong evidence that demand-side interventions are associated with increased utilization of services with more variable evidence of their impact on reducing early neonatal and maternal mortality. Further research is needed to understand how to maximize the potential of demand-side interventions to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes including the role of quality improvement and coordination with supply-side interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Bangladesh 1 <1%
Unknown 133 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 22%
Student > Master 27 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 6%
Other 27 20%
Unknown 12 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 21%
Social Sciences 24 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 3%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 18 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2019.
All research outputs
#7,185,563
of 13,568,727 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,488
of 2,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,031
of 352,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#149
of 290 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,568,727 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,475 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 290 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.