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Effect of high and low-supportive footwear on female tri-planar knee moments during single limb landing

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Effect of high and low-supportive footwear on female tri-planar knee moments during single limb landing
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13047-018-0294-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy A. Sayer, Rana S. Hinman, Kade L. Paterson, Kim L. Bennell, Karine Fortin, Adam L. Bryant

Abstract

Higher landing-related external knee joint moments at later stages of female pubertal development likely contribute to a higher incidence of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Athletic footwear may provide a potential strategy to alter higher knee moments. Thirty-one late/post-pubertal girls (Tanner stage IV-V, menarche and growth spurt attained) performed a single limb drop lateral jump in three footwear conditions (barefoot, low support shoes and high support shoes), in which peak knee abduction moment (KAbM), flexion moment (KFM) and internal rotation moments (KIRM) were measured. Repeated measures ANOVA and ANCOVA were used to test for a main effect of footwear with and without foot posture index (FPI) as a covariate (p < 0.05) with post-hoc test carried out via Fisher's Least Significant Difference (LSD). A main effect of footwear condition was observed for peak KFM (p < 0.05), but not KAbM or KIRM, in both unadjusted and adjusted models. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that both high- and low-support shoes increased peak KFM compared with barefoot (p < 0.001). Our findings indicate commercially available high- and low-supportive footwear increase peak KFM, but do not effect KAbM or KIRM while landing among late/post-pubertal girls. This suggests that these styles of footwear are inadequate at reducing higher knee moments in an at-risk cohort.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 40%
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Unspecified 2 13%
Researcher 1 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 40%
Unspecified 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,300,804
of 13,549,479 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#269
of 545 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,834
of 263,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,549,479 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 545 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,021 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them