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Cortical injury in multiple sclerosis; the role of the immune system

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, December 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
Title
Cortical injury in multiple sclerosis; the role of the immune system
Published in
BMC Neurology, December 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2377-11-152
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline A Walker, Anita J Huttner, Kevin C O'Connor

Abstract

The easily identifiable, ubiquitous demyelination and neuronal damage that occurs within the cerebral white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been the subject of extensive study. Accordingly, MS has historically been described as a disease of the white matter. Recently, the cerebral cortex (gray matter) of patients with MS has been recognized as an additional and major site of disease pathogenesis. This acknowledgement of cortical tissue damage is due, in part, to more powerful MRI that allows detection of such injury and to focused neuropathology-based investigations. Cortical tissue damage has been associated with inflammation that is less pronounced to that which is associated with damage in the white matter. There is, however, emerging evidence that suggests cortical damage can be closely associated with robust inflammation not only in the parenchyma, but also in the neighboring meninges. This manuscript will highlight the current knowledge of inflammation associated with cortical tissue injury. Historical literature along with contemporary work that focuses on both the absence and presence of inflammation in the cerebral cortex and in the cerebral meninges will be reviewed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 7%
Germany 1 3%
Russia 1 3%
Spain 1 3%
Japan 1 3%
Unknown 24 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 37%
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Professor 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 53%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 23%
Neuroscience 6 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2012.
All research outputs
#3,577,692
of 12,373,815 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#414
of 1,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,700
of 218,911 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#27
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,815 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 218,911 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.