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Factors behind job preferences of Peruvian medical, nursing and midwifery students: a qualitative study focused on rural deployment

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
Title
Factors behind job preferences of Peruvian medical, nursing and midwifery students: a qualitative study focused on rural deployment
Published in
Human Resources for Health, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0091-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luis Huicho, Cristina Molina, Francisco Diez-Canseco, Claudia Lema, J. Jaime Miranda, Carlos A. Huayanay-Espinoza, Andrés G. Lescano

Abstract

Deployment of health workforce in rural areas is critical to reach universal health coverage. Students' perceptions towards practice in rural areas likely influence their later choice of a rural post. We aimed at exploring perceptions of students from health professions about career choice, job expectations, motivations and potential incentives to work in a rural area. In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted among medical, nursing and midwifery students from universities of two Peruvian cities (Ica and Ayacucho). Themes for assessment and analysis included career choice, job expectations, motivations and incentives, according to a background theory a priori built for the study purpose. Preference for urban jobs was already established at this undergraduate level. Solidarity, better income expectations, professional and personal recognition, early life experience and family models influenced career choice. Students also expressed altruism, willingness to choose a rural job after graduation and potential responsiveness to incentives for practising in rural areas, which emerged more frequent from the discourse of nursing and midwifery students and from all students of rural origin. Medical students expressed expectations to work in large urban hospitals offering higher salaries. They showed higher personal, professional and family welfare expectations. Participants consistently favoured both financial and non-financial incentives. Nursing and midwifery students showed a higher disposition to work in rural areas than medical doctors, which was more evident in students of rural origin. Our results may be useful to improve targeting and selection of undergraduate students, to stimulate the inclination of students to choose a rural job upon graduation and to reorient school programmes towards the production of socially committed health professionals. Policymakers may also consider using our results when planning and implementing interventions to improve rural deployment of health professionals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 20%
Unspecified 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Lecturer 6 9%
Student > Master 6 9%
Other 19 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 17 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Social Sciences 7 11%
Psychology 5 8%
Other 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2017.
All research outputs
#2,374,571
of 13,616,431 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#317
of 732 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,340
of 356,133 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#36
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,616,431 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 732 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 356,133 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.