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The roles and training of primary care doctors: China, India, Brazil and South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
113 Mendeley
Title
The roles and training of primary care doctors: China, India, Brazil and South Africa
Published in
Human Resources for Health, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0090-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Mash, Magda Almeida, William C. W. Wong, Raman Kumar, Klaus B. von Pressentin

Abstract

China, India, Brazil and South Africa contain 40% of the global population and are key emerging economies. All these countries have a policy commitment to universal health coverage with an emphasis on primary health care. The primary care doctor is a key part of the health workforce, and this article, which is based on two workshops at the 2014 Towards Unity For Health Conference in Fortaleza, Brazil, compares and reflects on the roles and training of primary care doctors in these four countries.Key themes to emerge were the need for the primary care doctor to function in support of a primary care team that provides community-orientated and first-contact care. This necessitates task-shifting and an openness to adapt one's role in line with the needs of the team and community. Beyond clinical competence, the primary care doctor may need to be a change agent, critical thinker, capability builder, collaborator and community advocate. Postgraduate training is important as well as up-skilling the existing workforce. There is a tension between training doctors to be community-orientated versus filling the procedural skills gaps at the facility level. In training, there is a need to plan postgraduate education at scale and reform the system to provide suitable incentives for doctors to choose this as a career path. Exposure should start at the undergraduate level. Learning outcomes should be socially accountable to the needs of the country and local communities, and graduates should be person-centred comprehensive generalists.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 113 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 3%
Thailand 1 <1%
Unknown 109 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 20%
Researcher 15 13%
Student > Postgraduate 12 11%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Other 41 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 48%
Unspecified 16 14%
Social Sciences 12 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 3%
Other 19 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2019.
All research outputs
#1,185,331
of 13,658,724 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#145
of 735 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,985
of 357,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#19
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,658,724 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 735 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 357,158 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.