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Smoking as a predictor of frailty: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
Title
Smoking as a predictor of frailty: a systematic review
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0134-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gotaro Kojima, Steve Iliffe, Kate Walters

Abstract

Evidence on longitudinal associations between smoking and frailty is scarce. The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature on smoking as a predictor of frailty changes among community-dwelling middle-aged and older population. A systematic search was performed using three electronic databases: MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus for studies published from 2000 through May 2015. Reference lists of relevant articles, articles shown as related citations in PubMed and articles citing the included studies in Google Scholar were also reviewed. Studies were included if they were prospective observational studies investigating smoking status as a predictor and subsequent changes in frailty, defined by validated criteria among community-dwelling general population aged 50 or older. A standardised data collection tool was used to extract data. Methodological quality was examined using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for cohort studies. A total of 1020 studies were identified and systematically reviewed for their titles, abstracts and full-text to assess their eligibilities. Five studies met inclusion criteria and were included in this review. These studies were critically reviewed and assessed for validity of their findings. Despite different methodologies and frailty criteria used, four of the five studies consistently showed baseline smoking was significantly associated with developing frailty or worsening frailty status at follow-up. Although not significant, the other study showed the same trend in male smokers. It is of note that most of the estimate measures were either unadjusted or only adjusted for a limited number of important covariates. This systematic review provides the evidence of smoking as a predictor of worsening frailty status in community-dwelling population. Smoking cessation may potentially be beneficial for preventing or reversing frailty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 23%
Researcher 13 22%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 50%
Unspecified 11 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Psychology 3 5%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,882,691
of 12,406,609 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#540
of 1,229 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,778
of 334,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#53
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,406,609 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,229 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 334,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.