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Urological dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson’s disease: clues from clinical and non-invasive urological assessment

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, September 2018
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Title
Urological dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson’s disease: clues from clinical and non-invasive urological assessment
Published in
BMC Neurology, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12883-018-1151-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesca Valentino, Tommaso Vincenzo Bartolotta, Giuseppe Cosentino, Sergio Mastrilli, Valentina Arnao, Paolo Aridon, Salvatore Scurria, Alice Pavone, Carlo Pavone, Marco D’Amelio

Abstract

Autonomic nervous system dysfunction, common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), causes significant morbidity and it is correlated with poor quality of life. To assess frequency of urinary symptoms in patients with PD, without conditions known to interfere with urinary function. Non-demented PD patients were consecutively enrolled from the outpatients clinic of our department. Scales investigating motor and non-motor symptoms were carried out. Evaluation of urinary dysfunctions was carried out using the AUTonomic Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease (SCOPA-AUT) questionnaire. Patients underwent noninvasive urological studies (nUS), including uroflowmetry and ultrasound of the urinary tract. Forty-eight (20 women, 42%) out of 187 PD patients met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in the study. Mean SCOPA-AUT score was 14.1 ± 6.9 (urinary symptoms subscore 5.2 ± 3.8). Among those evaluated by the SCOPA-AUT scale, the urinary symptoms were among the most common complaints (93.8%). At nUS mean maximum flow rate (Qmax) was 17.9 ± 9.1 ml/s, and mean postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume was 24.4 ± 44.1 ml. Ultrasound investigation documented prostate hypertrophy in 12 male patients (42.8%). Urinary items of the SCOPA-AUT (SCOPA-U subscore) correlated with measures of disease severity only in female patients. Urinary symptoms and abnormal findings in nUS are common in PD. Though nigrostriatal degeneration might be responsible for urinary symptoms also in the early-intermediate stage of the disease, when urinary dysfunction occurs other medical conditions need to be excluded.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 44%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Neuroscience 2 22%
Unspecified 1 11%
Unknown 4 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2018.
All research outputs
#12,005,870
of 13,538,683 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#1,374
of 1,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,100
of 265,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#1
of 1 outputs
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