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The privatization of medical education in Brazil: trends and challenges

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
Title
The privatization of medical education in Brazil: trends and challenges
Published in
Human Resources for Health, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0095-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mário C. Scheffer, Mario R. Dal Poz

Abstract

Like other countries, Brazil is struggling with issues related to public policies designed to influence the distribution, establishment, supply and education of doctors. While the number of undergraduate medical schools and places available on medical schools has risen, the increase in the number of doctors in Brazil in recent decades has not benefitted the population homogeneously. The government has expanded the medical schools at the country's federal universities, while providing incentives for the creation of new undergraduate courses at private establishments. This article examines the trends and challenges of the privatization of medical education in Brazil. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study based on secondary data from official government databases on medical schools and courses and institutions offering such courses in Brazil. It takes into account the year when the medical schools received authorization to initiatte the activities, where they are situated, whether they are run by a public or private entity, how many places they offer, how many students they have enrolled, and their performance according to Ministry ofEducation evaluations. Brazil had 241 medical schools in 2014, offering a total of 20,340 places. The private higher education institutions are responsible for most of the enrolment of medical students nationally (54 %), especially in the southeast. However, enrolment in public institutions predominate more in the capitals than in other cities. Overal, the public medical schools performed better than the private schools in the last two National Exam of Students' (ENADE) . The privatization of the teaching of medicine at undergraduate level in Brazil represents a great challenge: how to expand the number of places while assuring quality and democratic access to this form of education. Upon seeking to understand the configuration and trends in medical education in Brazil, it is hoped that this analysis may contribute to a broader research agenda in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
United States 2 3%
Bangladesh 1 2%
Unknown 57 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 13%
Researcher 8 13%
Unspecified 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Other 21 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 45%
Unspecified 12 19%
Social Sciences 6 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#2,832,905
of 12,914,645 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#342
of 690 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,554
of 353,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#39
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,914,645 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 690 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 353,399 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.