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Bee venom ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced memory loss by preventing NF-kappaB pathway

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, June 2015
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Title
Bee venom ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced memory loss by preventing NF-kappaB pathway
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12974-015-0344-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sun Mi Gu, Mi Hee Park, Chul Ju Hwang, Ho Sueb Song, Ung Soo Lee, Sang Bae Han, Ki Wan Oh, Young Wan Ham, Min Jong Song, Dong Ju Son, Jin Tae Hong

Abstract

Accumulation of beta-amyloid and neuroinflammation trigger Alzheimer's disease. We previously found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused neuroinflammation with concomitant accumulation of beta-amyloid peptides leading to memory loss. A variety of anti-inflammatory compounds inhibiting nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activation have showed efficacy to hinder neuroinflammation and amyloidogenesis. We also found that bee venom (BV) inhibits NF-κB. A mouse model of LPS-induced memory loss used administration of BV (0.8 and 1.6 μg/kg/day, i.p.) to ICR mice for 7 days before injection of LPS (2.5 mg/kg/day, i.p.). Memory loss was assessed using a Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. For in vitro study, we treated BV (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mL) to astrocytes and microglial BV-2 cells with LPS (1 μg/mL). We found that BV inhibited LPS-induced memory loss determined by behavioral tests as well as cell death. BV also inhibited LPS-induced increases in the level of beta-amyloid (Aβ), β-and γ-secretases activities, NF-κB and its DNA-binding activity and expression of APP, and BACE1 and neuroinflammation proteins (COX-2, iNOS, GFAP and IBA-1) in the brain and cultured cells. In addition, pull-down assay and molecular modeling showed that BV binds to NF-κB. BV attenuates LPS-induced amyloidogenesis, neuroinflammation, and therefore memory loss via inhibiting NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, BV could be useful for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 25%
Student > Master 8 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Researcher 5 14%
Unspecified 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Other 9 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2019.
All research outputs
#10,704,134
of 13,454,351 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1,135
of 1,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#246,777
of 361,641 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#127
of 158 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,454,351 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,572 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 361,641 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 158 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.