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Potential anti-cancer effect of N-hydroxy-7-(2-naphthylthio) heptanomide (HNHA), a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, for the treatment of thyroid cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, December 2015
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Title
Potential anti-cancer effect of N-hydroxy-7-(2-naphthylthio) heptanomide (HNHA), a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, for the treatment of thyroid cancer
Published in
BMC Cancer, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1982-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seok-Mo Kim, Ki-Cheong Park, Jeong-Yong Jeon, Bup-Woo Kim, Hyeung-Kyoo Kim, Ho-Jin Chang, Seung-Hoon Choi, Cheong-Soo Park, Hang-Seok Chang

Abstract

Thyroid cancer has been indicated to have a higher global proportion of DNA methylation and a decreased level of histone acetylation. Previous studies showed that histone gene reviser and epigenetic changes role significant parts in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer tumorigenesis. The goal of this research was to study the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated actions of the dominant histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, N-hydroxy-7-(2-naphthylthio) hepatonomide (HNHA), in thyroid cancer and to explore its effects on apoptotic cell death pathways. Experiments were achieved to conclude the effects of HNHA in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) cell lines and xenografts, as compared with two other established HDAC inhibitors (SAHA; suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and TSA; trichostatin A). Apoptosis, which was induced by all HDAC inhibitors, was particularly significant in HNHA-treated cells, where noticeable B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) suppression and caspase activation were observed both in vitro and in vivo. HNHA increased Ca(2+) release from the ER to the cytoplasm. ER stress-dependent apoptosis was induced by HNHA, suggesting that it induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in PTC and ATC. PTC and ATC xenograft studies demonstrated that the antitumor and pro-apoptotic effects of HNHA were greater than those of the established HDAC inhibitors. These HNHA activities reflected its induction of caspase-dependent and ER stress-dependent apoptosis on thyroid cancer cells. The present study indicated that HNHA possibly provide a new clinical approach to thyroid cancers, including ATC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 25%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Unknown 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,232,632
of 8,208,063 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,229
of 3,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,767
of 312,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#102
of 190 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,208,063 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,465 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 190 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.