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Te Pākeketanga: living and dying in advanced age - a study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Palliative Care, December 2015
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
Title
Te Pākeketanga: living and dying in advanced age - a study protocol
Published in
BMC Palliative Care, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12904-015-0073-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Merryn Gott, Tess Moeke-Maxwell, Lisa Williams, Stella Black, Gabriella Trussardi, Janine Wiles, Rangimarie Mules, Anna Rolleston, Ngaire Kerse

Abstract

The number of people dying in advanced old age is increasing rapidly and building the evidence base regarding end - of - life care for older people has been identified as an international policy priority. The unique opportunity to link longitudinal studies of ageing with studies exploring the end of life circumstances of older people remains under-exploited internationally. Very little is known about the specific circumstances, cultural needs and care preferences of indigenous older people, including Māori, at end - of - life and the needs of their whānau/ extended family carers. We will use rigorous qualitative methods to conduct post-bereavement interviews with bereaved whānau and family of 50-60 people who died >80 years; approximately half of participants will be Maori. The older decedents were participants in the first longitudinal study of older people involving a specific indigenous cohort internationally: Te Puāwaitanga O Ngā Tapuwae Kia Ora Tonu, Life and Living in Advanced Age: a Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ). Prior to death, they completed a questionnaire regarding their end-of-life preferences and nominated a family or whānau member to participate in this separate study exploring end-of-life circumstances of those in advanced age. Recommendations to improve care will be formulated in collaboration with participants and their local hapū (sub-tribe). Ultimately this study has the potential to inform better outcomes for the growing numbers of people dying in advanced old age both in New Zealand and internationally, as well as their whānau and family caregivers. It also highlights the ability to generate an in-depth understanding of end-of-life circumstances by appending studies of palliative and end-of-life care onto existing longitudinal studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 28%
Student > Master 9 25%
Unspecified 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 36%
Social Sciences 8 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Psychology 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2016.
All research outputs
#8,037,828
of 13,343,065 outputs
Outputs from BMC Palliative Care
#490
of 587 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,468
of 358,386 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Palliative Care
#47
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,343,065 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 587 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,386 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.