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Use of Diuretics is not associated with mortality in patients admitted to the emergency department: results from a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine, January 2016
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Title
Use of Diuretics is not associated with mortality in patients admitted to the emergency department: results from a cross-sectional study
Published in
Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12952-016-0044-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominik G. Haider, Dominik G. Haider, Gregor Lindner, Michael Wolzt, Alexander Benedikt Leichtle, Georg-Martin Fiedler, Thomas C. Sauter, Valentin Fuhrmann, Aristomenis K. Exadaktylos

Abstract

Patients with diuretic therapy are at risk for drug-induced adverse reactions. It is unknown if presence of diuretic therapy at hospital emergency room admission is associated with mortality. In this cross sectional analysis, all emergency room patients 2010 and 2011 at the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland were included. A multivariable logistic regression model was performed to assess the association between pre-existing diuretic medication and 28 day mortality. Twenty-two thousand two hundred thirty-nine subjects were included in the analysis. A total of 8.5 %, 2.5 %, and 0.4 % of patients used one, two, or three or more diuretics. In univariate analysis spironolactone, torasemide and chlortalidone use were associated with 28 day mortality (all p < 0.05). In a multivariate cox regression model no association with mortality was detectable (p > 0.05). No difference existed between patients with or without diuretic therapy (P > 0.05). Age and creatinine were independent risk factors for mortaliy (both p < 0.05). Use of diuretics is not associated with mortality in an unselected cohort of patients presenting in an emergency room.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Student > Master 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Unknown 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 44%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,092,776
of 7,084,078 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine
#107
of 115 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#263,887
of 319,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine
#5
of 6 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 115 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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