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MS in South Asians in England: early disease onset and novel pattern of myelin autoimmunity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, May 2015
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Title
MS in South Asians in England: early disease onset and novel pattern of myelin autoimmunity
Published in
BMC Neurology, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12883-015-0324-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard S Nicholas, Vassiliki Kostadima, Maya Hanspal, Benjamin R Wakerley, Ruhena Sergeant, Saskia Decuypere, Omar Malik, Rosemary J Boyton, Daniel M Altmann

Abstract

Epidemiological studies describe a latitude gradient for increased MS prevalence and a preponderance of disease in Caucasian individuals. However, individuals from other ethnic backgrounds and low-risk regions can acquire a raised risk through migration. Nearly a fifth of the London population is of Asian/Asian-British origin and a significant proportion of referrals are from this group. We investigated whether there were differences in timing, presentation, severity, and immunology of disease (with respect to CD4 myelin epitope recognition) between individuals in London with MS who were either of S. Asian or Caucasian origin. Individuals of S. Asian origin with MS were compared with healthy S. Asian controls, individuals with MS and of Caucasian origin and Caucasian controls. Age at MS onset is significantly lower in the S. Asian group, attributable to earlier onset specifically in UK-born individuals, though clinical presentation is similar. Analysis of CD4 autoimmunity to myelin antigens shows disease in S. Asian individuals to encompass recognition of novel epitopes; immunity to MBP116-130 in S. Asian individuals was highly disease-specific. These findings emphasize the need to define disease profiles across ethnicities and identify environmental triggers conferring acquired risk. Such findings must inform choices for immunotherapeutic interventions suitable for all, across ethnicities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 29%
Unspecified 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 43%
Psychology 2 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,648,892
of 7,465,518 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#938
of 1,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,931
of 273,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#25
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,465,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.