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Exosomal transfer of proteins and RNAs at synapses in the nervous system

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Direct, January 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
178 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
261 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Exosomal transfer of proteins and RNAs at synapses in the nervous system
Published in
Biology Direct, January 2007
DOI 10.1186/1745-6150-2-35
Pubmed ID
Authors

Smalheiser, Neil R, Neil R Smalheiser

Abstract

Many cell types have been reported to secrete small vesicles called exosomes, that are derived from multivesicular bodies and that can also form from endocytic-like lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane. Secretory exosomes contain a characteristic composition of proteins, and a recent report indicates that mast cell exosomes harbor a variety of mRNAs and microRNAs as well. Exosomes express cell recognition molecules on their surface that facilitate their selective targeting and uptake into recipient cells. In this review, I suggest that exosomal secretion of proteins and RNAs may be a fundamental mode of communication within the nervous system, supplementing the known mechanisms of anterograde and retrograde signaling across synapses. In one specific scenario, exosomes are proposed to bud from the lipid raft region of the postsynaptic membrane adjacent to the postsynaptic density, in a manner that is stimulated by stimuli that elicit long-term potentiation. The exosomes would then transfer newly synthesized synaptic proteins (such as CAM kinase II alpha) and synaptic RNAs to the presynaptic terminal, where they would contribute to synaptic plasticity. The model is consistent with the known cellular and molecular features of synaptic neurobiology and makes a number of predictions that can be tested in vitro and in vivo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 261 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 248 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 79 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 21%
Student > Bachelor 30 11%
Student > Master 22 8%
Professor 16 6%
Other 48 18%
Unknown 12 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 122 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 33 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 12%
Neuroscience 24 9%
Engineering 7 3%
Other 28 11%
Unknown 16 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,888,008
of 14,565,263 outputs
Outputs from Biology Direct
#114
of 576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,339
of 123,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Direct
#5
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,565,263 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 576 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,102 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.